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Tracklist

Mitwirkende

Künstler: Delorean
Label: Matador

Rezension

Following a couple full-length albums and a move from Basque Country to Barcelona, Spain, Delorean reinvented themselves on the critically acclaimed Ayrton Senna EP (2009) and continue in that same direction on Subiza, a full-length effort with a wider range of stylistic approaches. Fronted by vocalist and bassist Ekhi Lopetegi, the quartet's alternative dance style draws from both indie pop and electronic dance music, Balearic house in particular. While reminiscent to indie favorites like Cut Copy and Air France, Delorean aren't really indie electronic in the same sense. The nine tracks comprising Subiza are full-on dance music influenced by the Barcelona techno scene and the Balearic style associated with Ibiza and other Mediterranean hot spots. In a way, Delorean are reviving the Balearic-influenced acid house style from 20 years ago, harking back to British alternative dance classics like New Order's Technique (1989) and Primal Scream's Screamadelica (1991). Delorean are far less grounded in rock, however, and they benefit greatly from modern-day technology. Their songs are densely layered and so drenched in synth, samples, and beats that one might be surprised to learn that Delorean are an actual band and not a one- or two-man production team. Though low in the mix, the vocals of Lopetegi are an integral layer of the music, as are the vocal samples that float around in the background. Take for instance the album-opening highlight "Stay Close," on which the vocals of Lopetegi don't begin until a full minute into the song. He doesn't sing a lot on this song nor on any of the others, but the vocals anchor the track melodically and give it something of a pop song structure. The chopped-up vocal samples ("hey, babe," "get up," et al.) that drift in and out of the track are also important from a melodic standpoint. All of these vocals, be they proper or sampled, go a long way toward making Delorean more than just another dance act. Subiza is a dance album, make no mistake, but it's far from typical and it's blissful enough to be enjoyed at home in the midst of Beach House, Hot Chip, and LCD Soundsystem. ~ Jason Birchmeier